Why Does Wood Burn?

This question usually sounds like that during the times of Stone Age. It sounds like a question asked at the dawn of the Stone Age.  Almost all grade students surely tried this experiment along these lines in Science class. The answer got was just as when smoke started forming. The moral of the story advises to keep matchsticks away from misguided children.

All living things burn, but dried wood burn easily

Organic matter such as oxygen, carbon and hydrogen composes to make living things. The presence of oxygen causes living things to burn. Wood burns easily because it has very little water, especially if it is dried in the sun. This is the reason it easily catches fire because its carbon and hydrogen component burns. Still not all woods are don’t easily catch fire.

burning wood Why Does Wood Burn?

What happens generally is that wood oxidizes easily but does not catch fire unless it reaches its so-called flash point.  By that time, wood releases gas where there is an interface between the flame and the surface, this is the part that appears on fire but actually it doesn’t. The gap is the point where oxidation-reduction happens in which fire supports itself up to 900 degrees F.

Parts of wood

Organic compounds are the parts of wood that catches fire, they are found in large deposits in its liquid and bark. The tree’s liquid contains deposits of glucose which is a volatile compound, it means that it is flammable. Wood also has carbon and ash that resists burning. They are in fact potassium, calcium and magnesium deposits. The smoke which is seen in burning wood or paper is actually a bunch of hydrocarbons that are freed from the surface of the wood. When the temperature of the heat reaches about 300 degrees F, this is the evaporating point. A temperature higher than that will catch fire.

When charcoal is burned, too much fire is not seen since charcoal is pure carbon. The little burning fire comes from remaining glucose deposits and hydrogen.

Uses of wood

Wood in its natural form is biodegradable and this is the reason it enriches the earth. It keeps the surrounding air cool and even it is burned, it requires less energy as compared to steel. Wood is always renewable.

Wood is used for building houses, shelter, furniture, bridges, fences and many others things. According to many designers, wood is much more pleases the eye much more than metal or concrete.

Uses of fire

Everyone knows that fire was not just used by early men for warming themselves during night. They also used it for many other purposes like cooking, lighting their path for hunting as well as keeping wild animals away. Fire helped our ancestors to mark their places in the vast darkness of forests while hunting in the wilds. In the process they discovered that burning grass proved good for both the forest and the land. Ash served as perfect fertilizer for the ground making place for new crops, grass and forest plants. Although due to rising climate change, having a forest fire is not a good idea.

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